Library 4

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Bennetto, Jason; Truth test' to uncover false rape allegations, Oct 31 2000
A "lie-detector" test to help uncover false allegations of rape is being developed by the police and criminologists.
Between 10 and 41 per cent of allegations of rape are made up by the "victim", according to previous research. In the new test, a claimant's statement is analysed and points are given from a list of set clues - people who have made up a rape allegation get a low score, while genuine complaints get a high score.
C
Clancy, Susan A.; The Trauma Myth - Susan Clancy - The Book; 257 pp
Consensual, non-violent/not overtly coercive sexual activity involving adults and minors, contrary to popular belief, does NOT normally cause trauma to young people - even when engaged it at a very early age. Susan Clancy demonstrates this through her research, but fails to reach this (obvious) conclusion in her text.
This file gives some comments and reviews present in Ipce's library, as well as a link to the .PDF version of the book.
Clancy, Susan A.; The Trauma Myth: Understanding the True Dynamics of Sexual Abuse, Jun 03 2010
Susan Clancy, in a nutshell, describes her theories on why sexual abuse is not seen as such by victims until the therapist has "reconceptualized" fully for the victim how the victims truly were abused and how their trust had been violated, even though the victims originally deny having felt that they had actually been abused.
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Gieles, Frans; The tail end of a dachshund
In May 2011, the Martijn Association decided to set up an Ethics Commission. Ethics is concerned with the question of what is good and what is bad; with values, norms and guidelines. [...]
In this article, I aim to place these guidelines in a broader context, namely that of the debate which has taken place in the Netherlands – and far beyond its borders – since the 1990s. The commission does not come up with any revolutionary, new advice, but follows up on a long-standing discussion, like the tail end of a long dachshund.
It shows that, as long as people with paedophilic feelings are allowed to enter into serious discussion, far from ending up in ‘raunchy suggestions’ the end result is an actual ethical code – and a fairly strict one at that.
Gieles, Frans; Turning Points and Chains of Changings …
I will highlight some turning points and the changes that have followed within the Netherlands during the last ten decades.
First: liberalization. Then: some severe incidents > Moral Panic > magnifying the incident > more rules and laws > gradually fading out the panic.
More and more severe rules and laws followed.
Pro- and Contra Groups appeared.
Two contrasting trends are visible. Contra groups, but also more nuanced ideas of professional helpers, researchers and even the popular press: the difference between pedophilia (feeling) and pedosexuality (acts) is acknowledged. The ‘pedophiles’ themselves have developed a new ethical code [...]
Here appears [...] the “NOMAP”, the Non Offending Minor Attracted person. He or she might become welcome in society, no longer as a ‘distorted patient’, but as a person with a less common (sexual) orientation, which is not dangerous as long as the person has the self-discipline to control his or her impulses, just as every (sexual) orientation demands to every person.
Ginsberg, Alan; Thoughts on NAMBLA
Alan Ginsberg describes the reason why he joined NAMBLA. He also describes the task NAMBLA has to fulfil.
Green, Richard; The Trauma Myth; Archives of Sexual Behavior
Book review of: The Trauma Myth, By Susan A. Clancy. Basic Books, New York, 2009.
The headline, press release, book title message trumpeted here is: Most children who experience sexual contact with adults are not traumatized at the time of the experience. [...]
Nevertheless, Clancy repeatedly reminds us how evil this non-traumatic (at the time) experience actually is. This moral mantra is identified as the catalyst of later trauma: ‘‘It is the act of sexual abuse and not the damage it causes that makes it wrong’’ (p. 185)
H
Harris, Ray; The Trauma Myth by Susan Clancy (book review and commentary by Ray Harris)
Ray notes that many victims are not heared because their story does not fit with the generally accepted trauma model of, among others, David Finkelhor.
He notes that Clancy indeed does listen to the victims, but that she also gives a moral judgement.
"Always, always listen to the victim. If they tell you they thought it was wrong, but liked it and went along with it, then accept what they say and validate their experience.
Whatever you do, don’t become morally outraged on their behalf because then they might to begin to doubt themselves and enter the spiral of negative thoughts that are the real cause of stress.
[...] Dare I suggest that more harm, more trauma has been caused by the self-appointed moral protectors than by the the actual abuse itself."
Herman, Peter; The Trauma Myth - Susan A. Clancy - (book review)
In her book, The Trauma Myth, Susan Clancy, citing her scientific study, details a finding that anyone who has ever been subjected to non-violent, but unsolicited sexual advances in childhood could have come to on their own. Namely, the experience is seldom traumatic to the individual at the time. Although I have not done any formal research in this area, my own experiences, some of which I will expound on shortly, can attest to the validity of Clancy's astonishing finding.
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Insel, Thomas; Transforming Diagnosis, Apr 29 2013
In a few weeks, the American Psychiatric Association will release its new edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-V).
The weakness is its lack of validity.
The DSM diagnoses are based on a consensus about clusters of clinical symptoms, not any objective laboratory measure.
Patients with mental disorders deserve better.
NIMH has launched the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) project to transform diagnosis.
The diagnostic system has to be based on the emerging research data, not on the current symptom-based categories.
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JORis, NVSH Workgroup, & Gieles Frans E. J.; Three reports and an essay from the Netherlands
In the Netherlands still exists since about fourty years a self-help encounter group, now even two groups of the "NVSH", the Dutch Association for Sexual Reform, now named the "NVSH JORis Groups JON and West".
"JON is a Dutch support group for people that have the ability to fall in love with children, but who do not want to activate those feelings into sexual acts with children.”
Here four links are given: three (half-)annual Reports and an essay.
The essay describes the methodology.
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Lebrecht, Norman; The trouble with boys, May 10 2006
It is no secret that Britten liked boys, and liked them young. He wrote them into some 30 works. In his operas boys are pivotal, start to finish. [...] There is no masking the composer’s affinity for the puerile, a fascination glossed away as Peter Pannish while he was alive but hedged nowadays by widespread and wholly justified anxieties of paedophilia, a malignant vice borne on internet wings.
It is this love of boys that triggers our squeamishness about Britten and the sooner we get to the root of it the sooner we will be able to embrace the work without qualm. [...]
Yes, he was interested in boys, but they were no more than reflections of the boy in himself, an inner voice that was, as he sometimes hinted, the source of his inspiration, an ideal of beauty and goodness. [...]
The time has come to lay the rumours to rest and concentrate on the benefice of the Britten legacy.
M
Mader, D. H.; "The individual can ...": Objectifying consent; Thymos; 4(2), 103-112, Oct 01 2010
The issue of age of consent for sexual activities has been bedevilled by the absence of any objective standards or criteria for what is meant by or involved in 'consent'. Despite this absence-or because of it-the social and political response has been to reach for blanket prohibitions on sexual activity by persons under particular ages-ages which have settled in the mid- to late teens.

At the same time, the percentages of persons aged 15 and under who are sexually active in our societies indicate that young people are regularly consenting to sexual activities. Consent to sexual activity has also been a concern in relation to the lives of the cognitively or mentally impaired.

In an attempt to clarify issues surrounding consent there, a significant proposal in regard to objectifying standards for consent was reported by Carrie Hill Kennedy, in her article "Assessing Competency to Consent to Sexual Activity in the Cognitively Impaired Population" (Journal of Forensic Neuropsychology 1:3, 1999), where she developed a two-part scale for ability to consent, including twelve criteria involving knowledge and five criteria involving personal assertiveness and safety. Kennedy herself has maintained that there is no relevance for her research as applied to minors: adults have sexual rights, minors do not.

However, it would seem clear that there is a certain relevance-if not in the use of a similar scale for assessing the competence of a particular minor to consent, then in generally comparing the age at which children attain the developmental level comparable with that implied by Kennedy's five Safety standards, and using that information to critique the present, obviously unrealistic ages of consent. In relation to the Knowledge scale, the importance of sexual education becomes still clearer.
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Pancrazi, Jean-Noël, & Thorstad David(Translation); A tribute to Tony Duvert, Aug 23 2008
The writer Tony Duvert, 63, was discovered dead on Wednesday, August 20, at home, in the small village of Thoré-la-Rochelle (Loir-et-Cher). He had been dead for about a month. An investigation has been started, but he appears to have died of natural causes.
Tony Duvert had a genuine fervor: for nature, central especially to Quand mourut Jonathan (1978, tr. 1991 by D. R. Roberts as When Jonathan died), which recalls the love of a man and a child. This relationship takes on the appearance and the rhythm of a biological association, as if, by dint of understanding and harmony, they both had become plants mutually emitting harmful poisons to each other until they were destroyed and separated by society.
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Rubin, Gayle S.; Thinking Sex
Thinking Sex: Notes for a Radical Theory of the Politics of Sexuality; 1984

In this essay, ?rst published in 1984, Rubin argues that in the West, the 1880s, the 1950s, and the contemporary era have been periods of sex panic, periods in which the state, the institutions medicine, and the popular media have mobilized to attach and oppress all whose sexual tastes differ from those allowed by the currently dominative model of sexual correctness.
She also suggests that during the contemporary era the worst brand of the oppression has been borne by those who practice s/m or cross-generational sex.
Rubin maintains that we are to devise a theory to account for the outbreak and direction of sexual panics, we shall need to base the theory on more than just feminist thinking. Although feminist thinking explains gender injustices, it does not and cannot provide by itself a full explanation for the oppression of sexual minorities.
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Seto, Michael C.; The Tanner Stages and more from Seto 2018
Figures 1.2, 1.3, 2.2., a link in chapter 2 and table 8.2
in Seto's book.
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Tsang, Daniel C.; Taboo Sex Research: Thinking Outside the Box; 10 pp, Aug 31 2013
Foreword to a collection of essays on Censoring Sex Research, reviewing recent history of sex research censorship.
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Underwager, Ralph, & Wakefield Hollida; Therapeutic Influence in DID and Recovered Memories of Sexual Abuse; Issues In Child Abuse Accusations; 8(3/4), 160-169
Dissociative identity disorder (DID, formerly multiple personality disorder, or MPD) remains highly controversial. Some researchers and clinicians believe DID represents a distinct psychiatric disorder with a unique and stable set of symptoms and behaviors; these professionals see a significant connection between DID and severe childhood abuse.
Others maintain DID is an iatrogenic disorder that is heavily dependent upon therapeutic, media, and cultural influences.
Despite this debate, there is general agreement that some patients, with the unwitting encouragement of their therapists, can learn to show symptoms of DID. Two case studies are presented that illustrate how therapists can encourage recovered memories of childhood sexual abuse and the development of alter personalities.