Library 4

Found 54 results

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1953
Kinsey, Alfred C., B. Pomeroy Wardel, E. Martin Clyde, & Gebhard Paul; The Sexual Behavior of the Human Female; 888 pp
Kinsey c.s.' book "The Sexual Behavior of the Human Female", 1953, is given here as a long pdf file.
1948
Kinsey, Alfred; Sexual Behavior in the Human Male (1948) - chapter 5 - Early Sexual Growth and Activity; 35 pp, 157 - 192
Chapter five, here presented as a .PDF file, is devoted to early sexual growth and activity and first sets out to define erotic arousal and orgasm, noting the variation in pattern of orgastic response in individuals.
One significant finding was that more than 99% of these boys adopted a regular routine of sexual activity after the initial experience of ejaculation.
Kinsey, Alfred, Pomeroy Wardell B., & Martin Clyde E.; Sexual Behavior in the Human Male (Chapter 21 - HOMOSEXUAL OUTLET); 0-1
[...] Homosexual contacts account, therefore, for a rather small but still significant portion of the total outlet of the human male. [...]
If homosexual activity persists on as large a scale as it does, in the face of the very considerable public sentiment against it and in spite of the severity of the penalties that our Anglo-American culture has placed upon it through the centuries, there seems some reason for believing that such activity would appear in the histories of a much larger portion of the population if there were no social restraints.
[...]
The homosexual has been a significant part of human sexual activity ever since the dawn of history, primarily because it is an expression of capacities that are basic in the human animal.
0
Russell, Wynne; Sexual violence against men and boys (in war-zones)
It is well known that armed conflict and sexual violence against women and girls often go hand in hand. What is less widely recognised is that armed conflict and its aftermath also bring sexual danger for men and boys. The great reluctance of many men and boys to report sexual violence makes it very difficult to accurately assess its scope. The limited statistics that exist almost certainly vastly under-represent the number of male victims. Nevertheless, in the last decade, sexualised violence against men and boys – including rape, sexual torture, mutilation of the genitals, sexual humiliation, sexual enslavement, forced incest and forced rape – has been reported in 25 armed conflicts across the world. If one expands this tally to include cases of sexual exploitation of boys displaced by violent conflict, the list encompasses the majority of the 59 armed conflicts identified in the recent Human Security Report.1