B4U-ACT; DSM Revision 5 - Comment on Entry for Pedophilia - B4U-ACT
The DSM’s diagnostic criteria and accompanying text for pedophilia have a profound influence on the accuracy of the professional literature and on the extent to which minor-attracted people (MAPs) are stigmatized by it, which in turn affects their willingness to seek mental health services. This comment analyzes the proposed DSM-5 diagnostic criteria and the DSM-IV-TR accompanying text for pedophilia for accuracy and potential sources of stigma. (The DSM-IV-TR accompanying text is examined because the proposed DSM-5 accompanying text has not been made publicly available for comment.) Then, this comment uses survey results to demonstrate the extent to which MAPs actually feel stigmatized by the DSM and related literature, and how this contributes to their reluctance to seek mental health services. Finally, it proposes guidelines for revising the DSM so that it will serve its professed purpose of helping practitioners identify the needs of their clients.
Allen Frances, MD, & Michael B. First MD; Hebephilia Is Not a Mental Disorder in DSM-IV-TR and Should Not Become One in DSM-5; Journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law; 39(1), 78-85, Feb 01 2011
The paraphilia section of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) is being misinterpreted in the forensic evaluations of sexually violent offenders. The resulting misuse of the term paraphilia not otherwise specified, hebephilia, has justified the inappropriate involuntary commitment of individuals who do not in fact qualify for a DSM-IV-TR diagnosis of mental disorder. This article has two purposes: to clarify what the DSM-IV-TR was meant to convey and how it has been twisted in translation within the legal system, and to warn that the DSM-5 proposal to include pedohebephilia threatens to make the current bad situation very much worse in the future.
Hinderliter, Andrew C.; Defining Paraphilia in DSM-5: Do Not Disregard Grammar; Journal of Sex and Marital Therapy; 37, , Jan 07 2011
Blanchard has proposed a definition of paraphilia for DSM-5, delimiting a range of so-called normative sexuality, and defining paraphilia as any intense and persistent sexual interest other than that. The author examines the wording and intended meaning of this definition, and he argues that there are many problems with it that "correct" interpretation requires ignoring what it says. Because of these problems and the possibility of civil commitment under sexually violent predator/person laws on the basis of a diagnosis of paraphilia NOS, caution and careful consideration of grammar are urged in drafting a definition of paraphilia for DSM-5.
Kramer, Richard; APA Guidelines Ignored in Development of Diagnostic Criteria for Pedohebephilia, Oct 30 2010
This Letter describes how the proposed DSM-5 criteria for pedohebephilia
have been developed without following four key guidelines specified by the American Psychiatric Association (APA) and to point out significant flaws that have resulted. It also proposes solutions.

The failures described above have resulted in serious flaws
in the proposed diagnostic criteria - Kramer mentions five flaws.

There are significant ethical consequences of the above
failures.

The APA and the paraphilias subworkgroup have an intellectual
and ethical responsibility to promote valid research and
to counter rather than reinforce false stereotypes.

There are steps they can take to fulfill this responsibility - follow five points.
Green, Richard; Hebephilia is a Mental Disorder?
The proposed inclusion of a hebephilic sexual orientation (early pubescent males and/or females) in DSM-5 compromises the scientific credibility of psychiatry. Moralism about the age of an acceptable sexual partner drives this proposal. It ignores common patterns of sexual arousal, cultural variability, and historic precedents. It blurs the domains of psychiatry and law. The age of sexual consent is 14 in much of Europe. An example of the new "mentally disordered" would be a 19 year old with a consenting 14 year old. Where sexual interaction is legally accepted, but pathologized as mental disorder, psychiatry attempts to act as an agent of social control.
Moser, Charles; Problems with Ascertainment; Archives of Sexual Behavior; 39(6), 1225–1227
Blanchard, Ray, Lykins Amy D., Wherrett Diane, Kuban Michael E., Cantor James M., Blak Thomas, et al.; Pedophilia, hebephilia, and the DSM-V; Archives of Sexual Behavior; 38, 335-350
The present study sought to validate the concept of hebephilia by examining the agreement between self-reported sexual interests and objectively recorded penile responses in the laboratory.
[...]
These results indicated that hebephilia exists as a discriminable erotic age-preference.
The authors recommend various ways in which the DSM might be altered to accommodate the present findings. One possibility would be to replace the diagnosis of Pedophilia with Pedo-hebephilia [...].