Library 4

Found 377 results

1987
Dannecker, Martin; Bemerkungen zur strafrechtlichen Behandlung der Pädosexualität
Gewaltlos pädosexuelle Begegnungen und Beziehungen sind, trotz der im letzten Absatz erhobenen kritischen Einwände, nichts Monströses. [...]
Die Pönalisierung verstärkt ferner die Schuldgefühle der Erwachsenen, mit denen sich das Kind identifiziert. Unbestreitbar führt das zu zusätzlichen psychischen Belastungen der Kinder, die eine sexuelle Beziehung mit einem Erwachsenen haben.

* Russian translation added.
1988
Stuit, Marianne; My child does it with a pedophile; 'NIEUWE REVU' FOUND PARENTS WHO APPROVE OF IT, May 05 1988
Sexual relations with minors are criminal. Also criminal are the parents who allow their children to have such contacts with adults. Even so, Nieuwe Revu found parents who accept such a relation. They tell from what motives they take that position and how they practically deal with this situation. "By now everyone is suspect because of Oude Pekela. It threatens to create a witch hunt."
1989
Mydans, Seth; In a Philippine Town, Child Prostitution, Despite Protests, Is a Way of Life; New York Times, Feb 05 1989
Parents come out in support of pedophiles.
Nations, United; United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (20 November 1989), Nov 20 1989
Text of the Declaration of Children's Rights by the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, 20 November 1989
1990
Garland, Randall J., & Dougher Michael J.; The Abused/Abuser Hypothesis of Child Sexual Abuse: A Critical Review of Theory and Research; 488-509
A widespread belief among the general public and professionals alike is that “sexual abuse causes sexual abuse”. That is, sexually abused children and adolescents who have engaged in sexual behavior with an adult (or a significantly older adolescent) are commonly thought to be at risk in later years of themselves becoming sexually involved with children and adolescents. This belief is referred to here as the “abused/abuser hypothesis of child and adolescent sexual abuse.”
Given the popularity of the abused/abuser hypothesis, it is perhaps surprising to find that there is a dearth of evidence supporting it. This is not to say that there is a substantial body of contradictory evidence. Rather, only a handful of studies have actually investigated the presumed association, and the designs and methods of these studies have been less than ideal. Most of the relevant data come from retrospective studies of adults that do not allow for direct causal analysis.
"The conclusion that seems warranted from the review is that childhood and adolescent sexual contact with adults is neither a necessary nor a sufficient cause for becoming an adjudicated sex offender of children or adolescents."
"Thus, sexual contact with an adult during childhood or adolescence is not a necessary cause for becoming an adjudicated adult sex offender of children and adolescents. Sexual contact with an adult during childhood or adolescence also does not appear to be a sufficient cause for becoming an adjudicated sex offender of children and adolescents."
"In summary, the abused/abuser hypothesis — the belief that sexual behavior between adults and children or adolescents causes those children and adolescents, as adults, to become sexually involved with other children and adolescents — is inadequate and incorrect."
"The belief that sexual abuse causes sexual abuse, the so-called “abused/abuser hypothesis,” is simplistic and misleading."
"The conclusion reached is that sexual contact with an adult during childhood or adolescence is neither a necessary nor a sufficient cause of adult sexual interest in children or adolescents."
Eibl-Eibesfeldt, Irenaus; Dominance, Submission, and Love: Sexual Pathologies from the Perspective of Ethology; 150 - 175
In human sexual behavior, strata of different phylogenetic origins can be distinguished. Sexuality based upon the mechanisms of male dominance and female submission, which characterizes the reptiles, also constitutes the basic layer of human sexuality. This reptilian heritage is superimposed, however, by a more recently acquired sexuality characterized by affiliation and love. The new potentiality to act in a friendly manner evolved with the development of parental care independently in birds and in mammals.
In normal human sexual behavior, the archaic agonal sexuality is controlled by affiliative sexuality and, therefore, is characterized by love. Agonal sexuality is still with us, however, as indicated, among other features, by the phallic male-dominance displays, by a male hormonal response linked to dominance achievement, and by the sexual fantasies of submission that are experienced by females. Agonal sexuality normally is under the control of affiliative sexuality, and therefore, humans correctly associate sex with love. Certain forms of sexuality, such as sadomasochism and a particular form of male homosexuality, are explained as being a regression to the archaic agonal sexuality.
Pedophilia and pedosexual behavior are explained within the regression context, too. Children have characteristics, such as small size, that facilitate adult males' feeling dominant to them, as occurs in pedosexual behavior.
Since human adult/adult romantic love is derived by phylogeny from parental caregiving behavior, it is easily seen how, in some adult humans, the feeling of love toward children has been retained and eroticized, which is the true meaning of the term "pedophilia."
Ames, Ashley M., & Houston David A.; Legal, Social, and Biological Definitions of Pedophilia; Archives of sexual behavior; 19(4), 333-341
Although there is substantial evidence in the historical and anthropological record of the sexual use of children by adults, surprisingly little is known about the etiology of pedophilia or its relation to other forms of sexual aggression. After briefly reviewing the research on pedophilia, we argue that one major difficulty in conducting or interpreting such research lies in the different definitions “pedophilia” has received. Most important, much of the research has accepted a legal definition of pedophilia, treating all offenders convicted of “child molestation” as pedophiles, regardless of the age or appearance of the victim. We argue that a distinction should be made between biological children and socio-legal children. Laws governing child molestation reflect sociolegal childhood, regardless of its discrepancy with biological childhood.“True” pedophiles should be identified by their preference for biological children. [A]

By using legal classifications, researchers may well be confusing two distinct types of offenders, child molesters and rapists, and confounding attempts to understand pedophilia.
Money, John; Pedophilia: A Specific Instance of New Phylism Theory ...; 18 pp
In society and in the criminal justice system, there are the prevalent assumptions that pedophilia is a voluntary orientation and a product of jaded depravity and that the next step will be sadistic assault and molestation ending up in lust murder. These assumptions are faulty and are based on rare and sporadic cases in which there is an overlapping of pedophilia, which is a paraphilia of the eligibilic/stigmatic type, with a paraphilia of the sacrificial/expiatory type. Pedophilia, both androphilic and gynephilic, is its own syndrome, unaccompanied by sacrificial or expiatory cruelty.
. . .
The pedophile's attachment to a child represents a merger of parental and erotic love.
. . .
Based on its roots in the Greek language, "pedophilia" means "child love." Two meanings of love are telescoped into the one word. One meaning is love as in parental love and pairbonding between parent and child. The other meaning is love as in making love and the sexual bonding of two partners, one of which is a juvenile. The two meanings share in common the reciprocality of bonding between two people.
(ed.), Jay Feierman R.; Pedophilia: Biosocial Dimensions; 600 pp
Most of the lay and professional literature although voluminous, reflect a narrow anthropo-, ethno-, and chrono-centrism that precludes any real understanding of the topic with anything more than the preconceptions of our times. [...]
[...] This volume adds to this data base by including new, biosocial contribution from the perspectives of history, political science, sexology, biology, primatology, anthropology, experimental and developmental psychology, and psychiatry. What results is a transspecies, transcultural, and transhistorical perspective that gives new biosocial insights into the roots of pedophilia as the phenomenon is found in contemporary industrialized societies.
Medicus, Gerhard, & Hopf Sigrid; The Phylogeny of Malel/Female Differences in Sexual Behavior; pp 122 - 149
This chapter offered a biology-based contribution toward a better understanding of the male/female dimorphism of human sexual behavior.
This dimorphism helps in explaining why adult human sexual behavior with children and adolescents is almost exclusively an adult male phenomenon.
However, the views elucidated in this chapter should by no means be misused to excuse or justify socially insensitive behavior toward any adult female, any child, or any adolescent or to reinforce socially unjust male dominance.
Rather, biological knowledge that clarifies human behavioral predispositions should encourage the prevention of negative behavior and enhance the personal and social aspects of human relationships.
Diamond, Milton, & (Ed.) Feierman J.; Selected Cross-Generational Sexual Behavior in Traditional Hawai’i: A Sexological Ethnography
Published in: J. Feierman (Ed.), Pedophilia: Biosocial Dimensions (pp. 422-443)
Introduction

Anthropological studies of human sexual behavior traditionally are difficult to conduct and to interpret because so much of any sexual behavior is private and must be understood through reporting by others rather than through direct observation. Sexual behavior between adults and nonadults is especially difficult to study, but an understanding can be facilitated if one looks at that behavior across time, species, and societies. Hawai’i1 has several characteristics that make it a useful society in which to view such behavior.

Hawai’i was one of the first South Pacific societies to be visited and written about by Westerners (Cook, 1773). What it currently lacks in cultural purity, as a consequence of long association with foreigners, is partly compensated for by 200 years of contact and observation. Furthermore, over the years since Cook’s visit, published comparisons have been drawn between Hawai’i and lesser known societies in other parts of Oceania and Polynesia (e.g., Marshall and Suggs, 1971).

This author has spent more than 20 years living and working in Hawai’i as an academic sexologist. This chapter is written mainly for readers who will benefit from seeing aspects of selected cross-generational sexual behavior in the context of a non-Judeo-Christian and non-Western society.
1992
Underwager, Ralph, & Wakefield Hollida; Poor Psychology Produces Poor Law; Law & Human Behavior; 16(2), 
Both psychology and law are concerned with human behavior. Law depends upon what everyone knows and believes about human behavior, upon common knowledge. In contrast, psychology distrusts common knowledge and substitutes knowledge based on empirical data systematically gathered and rationally analyzed. This conflict may cause misunderstanding between law and psychology. However, a common ground of both law and psychology is the goal to reduce error.
The authors especially write about children's testimony in court. The APA's and the Supreme Court's demand that a psychologist before a testimony has to predict possible harm for the child, placed the psychologist for an impossible task and a difficult dilemma.
In APA's amicae Curiae letter about this topic, the authors find no evidence, only weak argumentation by means of weak research.
1993
Adshead, Gwen, & Mezey Gillian; Ethical issues in the psychotherapeutic treatment of paedophiles: Whose side are you on?; The Journal of Forensic Psychiatry; 4(2), 361-368
Abstract:
Although there has been some published literature addressing ethical issues in the chemical treatment of sex offenders (Bowden, 1991 ; Greenland, 1988) there has been relatively little discussion about the ethics of offering psychotherapeutic treatments of various kinds. This article addresses several ethical issues that arise in the context of the community treatment of sex offenders against children, based on the authors’ experience of working in time-limited groups with child sex abusers (Mezey et al., 1991a). We would suggest that the ethical issues that arise in the treatment of paedophiles are different from, and additional to, those encountered in the treatment of other types of offender. We address these issues under a number of sub-headings.
Conclusion:

As is common with ethical issues, more questions are raised than can be easily answered. This does not make discussion fruitless; rather it raises the quality of the debate. We argue that important ethical decisions are being made all the time in relation to the treatment of sex offenders. There is a real danger, however, that, like the original offences, such issues will be minimized, distorted and denied. We would suggest that workers need to achieve a balance of interests between the offender and the victim. To support one is not to harm the other.
Carol, Avedon; Fake Science And Pornography
Many researchers reveal shoddy, irresponsible work that you have to be a genius as well as an expert at reading these things to be able to give any kind of reasonable interpretation to their data. But shabby study results are being released into popular culture at such a rapid rate that one can hardly keep up with them.

Lately I spend the bulk of my time trying to counteract widely-held beliefs that have taken hold in the general culture because unsafe interpretations of raw results, some of these themselves of dubious reliability, are being spread around by speakers who pretend to be experts in the fields of sex, sex crime, pornography, aggression, women, men, and other related areas.

You can impel whole rooms full of angry women to march in the streets by telling them that "Studies in America showed that men became more violent after watching pornography," but you might merely bore them by trying to explain that no one has been able to duplicate this result, and in the two studies quoted, one was not using actual pornography but was using general release films.
Kendall-Tackett, Kathleen A., Williams Linda Meyer, & Finkelhor David; Impact of Sexual Abuse on Children A Review and Synthesis of Recent Empirical Studies; Psychological Bulletin; 113(1), 164-180
ABSTRACT
A review of 45 studies clearly demonstrated that sexually abused children had more symptoms than nonabused children, with abuse accounting for 15—45% of the variance. Fears, posttraumatic stress disorder, behavior problems, sexualized behaviors, and poor self-esteem occurred most frequently among a long list of symptoms noted, but no one symptom characterized a majority of sexually abused children. Some symptoms were specific to certain ages, and approximately one third of victims had no symptoms. Penetration, the duration and frequency of the abuse, force, the relationship of the perpetrator to the child, and maternal support affected the degree of symptomatology. About two thirds of the victimized children showed recovery during the first 12—18 months. The findings suggest the absence of any specific syndrome in children who have been sexually abused and no single traumatizing process.
Geraci, Joseph; Interview: Hollida Wakefield & Ralph Underwager; Paidika # 9, pp 2-12, 1993; pp 2-12
Quotes:
"Paedophiles can boldly and courageously affirm what they choose. They can say that what they want is to find the best way to love."
"Paedophiles can make the assertion that the pursuit of intimacy and love is what they choose. With boldness they can say, "I believe this is in fact part of God's will."
"Paedophiles need to become more positive and make the claim that paedophilia is an acceptable expression of God's will for love and unity among human beings."
Anonymous; No Thanks for the Memories
Repressed Memory Therapy (RMT) is based on the theory that certain dysfunctional behaviors and mental illnesses, such as depression, anxiety, bulimia, sexual inhibition, and anorexia, stem from childhood traumas such as physical or, more commonly, sexual abuse. In patients who exhibit no known history of trauma, but display severe behavior dysfunction, RMT uses a variety of techniques to "recover" a repressed memory of physical or sexual abuse. ...
Many RMT clients recalled memories of being forced into sexual acts, engaging in cannibal-ism, brutally slaughtering of animals for sacrifice, and even being coerced into allegedly murdering children or babies as part of cult rituals.
Sullivan, Randall; The Seduction of Peter Jay Rudge; Rolling Stone MAGAZINE, Jan 01 1993
A quite long but carefully reported true story of the close relationship between a women, Diana Walders, 40 year, and a boy, Peter Jay Rudge, 13 years.

The development and the form of the relationship is carefully told. Reading it, one might think of 'grooming' by the woman. She more or less seduced Peter Jay from the living sphere of his parents to the living sphere of Diana. The lady and the boy planned to 'disappear' together, to run away both from both their homes and families. This actually happened.

Forty days later, the pair was found by police. The boy was taken home, the lady was arrested.

The reporter guides the reader along the notes of two therapists of Peter Jay.
In the first therapy, Peter denied any sexual aspect in the relationship with Diana.

However, during the second therapy, Peter Jay told the therapist and his father and a priest about the quite frequent sexual contacts the pair has had.
During the trial, both therapist testified, as well as Peter Jay did, testifying also about his sexual adventures with Diana. Diana strongly denied such contacts.

Diana's lawyer found many inconsistencies in Peter Jay's testimony, as well as some impossibilities and improbabilities. "Too many for good evidence", said the jury.
1994
Wakefield, Hollida, & Underwager Ralph; The Alleged Child Victim and Real Victims of Sexual Misuse
Conclusions

The real victims of sexual abuse of children include all of us, because the system we have set up to eliminate abuse of children may be doing more damage than good.

Children may be harmed by the intervention.
Families, including extended family members, may be destroyed.
Grandparents may never see their grandchildren again.
Occupations that involve work with children become suspect: Teachers, preachers, boy scout leaders, big brothers, athletic coaches, day care workers, counselors, mental health professionals, and others are watched suspiciously by a society that asks why they choose to work with children.
Lonely people learn quickly to avoid all friendly actions toward children (Weinbach 1987).
Men learn that in spite of twenty years of rhetoric telling them they can have feelings and be gentle, if they are affectionate with children they can go to prison.
[...]
It must be possible for all who are concerned with reducing the abuse of children to agree cognitively that increasing the accuracy of the process is both desirable and attainable. There is more credible and reliable information now than a few years ago. It is possible now to assert [...]that there is a general consensus in the scientific community about some basic facts. Potentially this information can be used to develop a more accurate and reliable way to make decisions about child sexual abuse which will result in greater protection of abused children and less harm to innocent persons.
Gardner, Richard A.; The Sex-Abuse Time-Line Diagrams; IPT Journal, Vol 6, 3-5, 1994
When evaluating sexual abuse allegations it is extremely important to differentiate between symptoms that arose prior to disclosure and those that arose afterwards. Symptoms arising after the disclosure and cessation of abuse can be caused by sexual abuse therapy, multiple interrogations, and other aspects of the legal process. Therefore, in a sex-abuse examination it is necessary to inquire as to the timing of the development of any claimed symptoms. Diagrams are presented to facilitate this inquiry.
Ginsberg, Alan; Thoughts on NAMBLA
Alan Ginsberg describes the reason why he joined NAMBLA. He also describes the task NAMBLA has to fulfil.
Underwager, Ralph, & Wakefield Hollida; Misinterpretation of a Primary Prevention Effort; Child Abuse Accusations, 6(2), 96-107. (1994).; 1994(6(2), ), 96-107., Jan 01 1994
In 1990, Ralph Underwager and Hollida Wakefield gave an interview to the editor of Paidika, The Journal of Paedophilia, a scholarly journal published in Holland. The interview was published in 1993.
Since that time, statements from the interview have been taken out-of-context and misinterpreted as indicating that RU and HW approve of pedophilia and child sexual abuse.
Here, they respond to these criticisms and accusations.
The authors add an Appendix: A Proposal: Primary Prevention Program for Child Sexual Abuse.
1995
Underwager, Ralph, & Wakefield Hollida; Special Problems with Sexual Abuse Cases
In this essay, an addition to a book, the authors write about children's witness in courts and about the ways to diagnose possible harm after child sexual abuse. Rules for interviewing children are given; the us eof anatomic dolls is contra-advised.
In addition, they mention research in which is proven that not all victims are harmed by the act itself; bad family environment is more harming the child.
Conclusion:
The continued accumulation of scientific research remains supportive of efforts to increase the accuracy of determinations and opinions expressed in response to accusations of sexual abuse. Legal scholarship and philosophy of science are likely to produce marked changes in jurisprudence and development of different procedures in the justice system.
1996
Graupner, Helmut; Sexuality, Youth Protection & Human Rights
The study examines the extent to which common sexual offences concerning minors do protect this proposed comprehensive right to sexual self-determination. The analysis is based upon the findings of natural and social science as well as an extensive and detailed international survey of national legal provisions.
Underwager, Ralph, & Wakefield Hollida; Therapeutic Influence in DID and Recovered Memories of Sexual Abuse; Issues In Child Abuse Accusations; 8(3/4), 160-169
Dissociative identity disorder (DID, formerly multiple personality disorder, or MPD) remains highly controversial. Some researchers and clinicians believe DID represents a distinct psychiatric disorder with a unique and stable set of symptoms and behaviors; these professionals see a significant connection between DID and severe childhood abuse.
Others maintain DID is an iatrogenic disorder that is heavily dependent upon therapeutic, media, and cultural influences.
Despite this debate, there is general agreement that some patients, with the unwitting encouragement of their therapists, can learn to show symptoms of DID. Two case studies are presented that illustrate how therapists can encourage recovered memories of childhood sexual abuse and the development of alter personalities.